0
View Post
The Official Word on Sports Nutrition Regarding Diets and Body Composition…Discussion Over!

The Official Word on Sports Nutrition Regarding Diets and Body Composition…Discussion Over!

Let’s end this debate now.  The puzzle is now complete.  We have the data and we know what works.  We know the  ‘too much protein is bad for your kidneys’ talk that some doctors and others tout is wrong.  There is simply no data to validate this unless you have pre-existing, unrelated, kidney disease.  We know that fasting/cleansing is good for you, not bad.  For those who say ‘your body is always cleansing…that’s what the kidneys and liver are for,’ we can reply by showing them the research that far more can be done.  For those who say that ‘protein is protein, ‘  we can clearly demonstrate that this is not the case…not even close.  Many say ‘I’ve tried everything and nothing works.’  Maybe that person has tried other programs, but they most certainly have not incorporated caloric restriction and intermittent fasting.  If they had, they would’ve achieved the results they were looking for.  Being 80% of health and how we look is due to nutrition, whereas only 20% is due to exercise, it’s quite important to have a lifestyle system that addresses the 80% part.  By taking care of the 80% part, you will perform and recover better with the exercise part.  They are not mutually exclusive.  Lapses in nutrition will only get you more injuries.  I see this all too often.

You get the point.  It’s time to do what we know works instead of looking for excuses when it comes to diets and body modification.  This is about YOU and how you can feel, function, and look better.  Continue Reading →

0
View Post
Introducing the InBody 570 Body Composition Analyzer Part 3

Introducing the InBody 570 Body Composition Analyzer Part 3

The 3rd and final part of our discussion about the incredible InBody 570 covers 3 more studies that further validate its accuracy.  I know blogs that discuss studies aren’t always the most ‘fun’ to read, but it is important to have evidence readily available to show others that your InBody 570 bioelectrical  impedance analyzer assessment is vital to your health and should be part of your medical health history.  It can be used to help your primary care doctor (PCP) figure out ways to help you…hopefully many times through dietary intervention (like caloric restriction and intermittent fasting) vs. just administering drugs. Continue Reading →

0
View Post
Introducing the InBody 570 Body Composition Analyzer Part 2

Introducing the InBody 570 Body Composition Analyzer Part 2

Part 2 of the discussion on the InBody 570 covers two of five important studies (and there are more) that help to validate the accuracy and legitimacy of the InBody 570.  This technical and may I say, ahem, somewhat boring information is important to discuss as your healthcare providers like to see objective health data. It’s time for the entire healthcare industry to understand and embrace what improvements in body composition can do not only for the individual patient, but also for the healthcare system as a whole.  Figure it this way: the more healthy we are, the less disease we will have.  This translates to less healthcare costs and this is good for everyone!  This blog and the next one serve to help educate not only our patients and those who will want to come to our office to get assessed, but also their healthcare providers who will be viewing these results.  Body composition is SO important.

Whether you are on our body modification program (caloric restriction and intermittent fasting…and most all of you should be interested in this to optimize your health) or are an athlete looking to improve your performance and recovery in your respective sport, the 570 is unmatched on the market, it is FDA approved, and it provides data that is vital to your health.  This is about your health.  It’s time to think of your future and what you should be doing to live longer and healthier!

The first study of interest is from 2004 and the lead author is Shinichi Demura.  The study was published in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology and Applied Human Science.  The name of this study is Percentage of Total Body Fat as Estimated by Three Automatic Bioelectrical Impedance Analyzers. Continue Reading →

0
View Post
All Proteins Are Not Created Equal

All Proteins Are Not Created Equal

Yes, it’s true.  All proteins are not created equal. But before we can go further, we need to understand that our diet consists of macronutrients and micronutrients.  Proteins, carbohydrates, and fats are our macronutrients and micronutrients are what we ingest in smaller quantities, like our vitamins and minerals.

When we eat food, it does not declare itself as simply a carbohydrate, protein, or fat.  Most foods have a variety of macronutrient components and our bodies do an amazing job at breaking down each ingredient into particles that can then be utilized.  This is why eating high quality food without lots of chemicals is preferred.  Our body has enough to do without the need of bombarding it with toxins and unnecessary compounds.

There are basic components that make up proteins. They are called amino acids and there are 20 of them. Of these, 9 are considered ‘essential‘, because we cannot create them from other foods we eat. This means you have to consume them in the protein sources you are eating.  By definition, a complete protein is one that contains at minimum, all 9 of the essential amino acids. There are also 3 amino acids  in the essential amino acid family that are called Branch Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs).  These 3, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, are important for muscle function and many medical treatments.  In the fitness community, we want to ingest a lot of foods that contain BCAAs.  Luckily, most animal proteins contain BCAAs and all the other essential amino acids. Vegetarians and vegans can acquire BCAAs and essential amino acids, but many times this involves food combining, and food combining is not the most efficient way to achieve the objective. Continue Reading →

0
View Post
Sarcopenia is a Killer and You Should Know About It

Sarcopenia is a Killer and You Should Know About It

Sarcopenia is a condition that we are ALL at risk of getting and it’s really quite scary.  It is defined as a process of reduction in skeletal muscle mass and muscular function that begins after the third decade of life (yeah, by age 40) and progresses as we age.  If we look at the body as having hundreds of thousands of different proteins/enzymes, and each muscle is made up of primarily protein, this problem begins to look really bad.  It’s one thing to have loss of skeletal muscle and be able to see yourself getting softer and weaker as you age, it’s another to not be able to see the decay in our heart and other organs.  Think about it…you are not just losing muscle mass and health on the outside, it’s occurring on the inside as well.   The problem is that this will not be identified usually until you have a significant health problem…and who wants that?  Sarcopenia is a condition of malnutrition yet almost nobody in the US does anything about it until it causes serious health issues.

Healthcare costs in the year 2000 were 18.5 billion dollars for the treatment of Sarcopenia and its related disease processes and that number is far greater now (this amount constituted 1.5% of the total health care cost of the nation in 2000).  Sarcopenia is well studied in the literature and all physicians should be discussing this topic with their adult patients (before they become geriatric patients). Sarcopenia has a direct link to COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), contributes to osteoporosis and related fractures, increases hip fracture riskcontributes to mental disorders, increases the risk of postoperative complications, and more.

One of the bigger concerns with Sarcopenia is that it has a link to mitochondrial damage.  This is a big deal as mitochondrial damage is linked to almost all disease processes in the human body. So, listen up…if you are near 40, at 40, or over 40, you need to pay attention if you want to be healthy and maximize your life!  This is nothing to laugh about.  As a society, we are getting softer and weaker as we age and yes, we can do something about it.

For those out there who still think we get enough protein, the easy way to prove this point wrong is by looking at our population as a whole and recognizing that Sarcopenia affects a large amount of our adult population.  Simply put, we are wasting away…yikes!  We have to concede that very little is being done to address this serious problem. The great thing is that with some basic lifestyle improvements, we can get healthier…yes, it’s that simple!

We have to keep in mind that the out of date notion that ‘don’t eat too much protein as it leads to positive nitrogen balance or kidney damage’ is simply that: out of date.  This blog falls on the heels of my last blog that discussed what caloric restricted resistance training athletes need for protein needs.  To many, this amount of protein would seem high, but the research, for some time, has been showing that we are not consuming enough high quality protein.  It’s time for healthcare professionals to update their knowledge on protein and make proper recommendations.  More protein isn’t needed just for those who are lean and active, it’s needed for everyone!

Treatment for sarcopenia involves being active/exercising and eating more protein to offset the age-related loss.  A 2015 double blind randomized study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition determined that a Vitamin D and leucine enriched whey (protein) ‘nutritional supplement’ improved muscle mass and lowered the risk of Sarcopenia.  Another study from 2015, this one a review study, suggests at least 25-30gm of ‘high quality’ protein at each meal to prevent Sarcopenia.  Beasley et. al authored a great study in 2013 in Nutrition in Clinical Practice that discussed how whey protein works better than other proteins at muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and his study makes recommendations to consider protein supplementation for those who are Sarcopenic and are not getting in enough protein (this basically means all of them).   

In the next few blogs, I’ll be writing about the best ways to extend your life/reduce diseases as per the literature.  In regards to Sarcopenia, we need to get in more high quality protein.  So this begs the question: what is the best protein to ingest, how do I compare protein sources,  and where do I get the best stuff?  To whet your appetite, I’ll mention that the literature shows that whey is the best protein.  As to where to get it, ask me now or wait until I write about it.

More on its way…stay tuned!

 

Yourchiropractor.net is protected by Copyright laws.  If you wish to post any content from www.yourchiropractor.net, you must obtain express (written…this can be email) permission before doing so.  We spend a lot of time writing blogs to help everyone and we appreciate your respect for our intellectual property.   Thank you and to your health!

 

2
View Post
‘Leaner and Meaner’:  How Much Protein Do You Need?

‘Leaner and Meaner’: How Much Protein Do You Need?

There has always been a debate about how much protein an athlete needs.  ‘You need one gram per kilogram of weight’ or you need ‘one gram per pound of weight’ and some other somewhat random numbers are usually used to determine how much protein resistance training athletes need.  As a healthcare provider who works with athletes, I need to make sure my athletes have enough protein to ensure healthy soft tissue function and reduce the likelihood of injury. Without proper protein consumption, an athlete will not achieve his/her fitness goals, and if there’s an injury, the athlete will certainly need extra protein during the recovery phase to get better.  I won’t discuss the subject of sarcopenia in this blog but this topic too is a major crisis in our country.  So, how do we know where to really start?

A literature review study from 2014 in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism gives us a good formula for determining the range of protein needed for caloric restricted, resistance trained athletes. Before we go any further, we should define who these athletes are…. they are…you and me.  If you work out, want to look good, and want a high level of lean muscle mass (highly desirable for good health), then this formula applies to you.  In fact, if you just work out and wish to have healthy muscle, this formula will help you achieve your goals.  The bottom line is that athletes tend to ingest less protein than they need and this is a major concern.  Not only that, but they also are unlikely getting the best quality protein they can. Oh, this study also mentions that total fat consumption should not go below 20% of total calorie intake.  So what are we looking at?  A sensible caloric restricted diet with adequate micronutrient ingestion and the proper ratio of macronutrients.  So, you want to be ‘lean and mean’?…here’s how to achieve it… Continue Reading →