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Golf: Hip Rotation And Its Effect On Early Extension

Golf: Hip Rotation And Its Effect On Early Extension

As a certified Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 3 medical provider, I get the honor of treating a lot of golfers.  As golfers will tell you, the game is like a heroin addiction…but it’s actually more expensive!  A golfer will do just about whatever it takes to improve his/her game.  From shoes to gloves to clubs to lessons to whatever, nothing is too much if it will shed a few strokes off each round.  Whether the golfer is a 20 handicap or scratch or better golfer, improvements can always be made.  As is the case with any sports activity, proper stability and mobility are important and for a precision game like golf, they’re vital.

One major movement fault that many people and golfers alike have is a lack of internal hip rotation.  Proper hip mobility is not only vital for back health, but it is vital for proper swing mechanics.   I’d say, in my experience, that about 80% of golfers suffer from this issue.  It can be on the either side and depending which side it is on, the fault affects the backswing or the follow-through. Regardless of which one it is, it must be corrected to improve that score and lower the risk of musculoskeletal injuries…mostly, the force transmission into the low back.  This is one of the major reasons why so many golfers get low back pain. Continue Reading →

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The Dreaded DCO and What It Means To You and Your Shoulder!

The Dreaded DCO and What It Means To You and Your Shoulder!

DCO, or Distal Clavicular Osteolysis, is a rather bad shoulder condition that all too many athletes suffer from.

DCO occurs when we have damage to our AC (acromioclavicular) joint and it goes unattended to for a period of time.  More-so than that, additional damage is done with further activity and the bones that make up the joint get significant damage.

The AC joint is made up of where the distal clavicle bone meets the acromion process of the scapula (see photo below).  A sprain of the AC joint tends to involve a macrotrauma (one significant injury) such as a bad fall or other form of side shoulder impact.  The AC joint tends to get hypermobile (or move too much) easily as it is not a very stable joint to begin with.  When the joint is injured, or sprained, care is needed to stabilize the joint and allow for it to heal.  In-office treatments can significantly reduce recovery time and this is important as a healing AC joint sprain is susceptible to further injury.   Continue Reading →

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The Biceps Tear…What You Should Know

The Biceps Tear…What You Should Know

There are two heads to the biceps brachii, the long head (that goes from the labrum to just past the elbow…the outside one in the picture) and the short head (that goes from the coracoid process to just below the elbow…the inside one in the picture).  We rely on each muscle for shoulder flexion, elbow flexion, and some supination (hand rotated upward) of the forearm/wrist/hand.  Of the two heads, the long head tends to tear more as it thins out as it travels into the shoulder and it is more susceptible to damage at its attachment on the shoulder labrum.

The muscle can tear due to age-related wear and tear, labral tearing, overuse and trauma.  Generally, muscles tear from either the origin (where it begins proximally), or the insertion (the distal attachment).  When the biceps tears from the insertion, it will tend to roll up the arm and form a ball in the middle of the biceps region.  This type of tear tends to be very noticeable. Continue Reading →